To learn about our efforts to improve the accessibility and usability of our website, please visit our Accessibility Information page. Skip to section navigation or Skip to main content
Below is an advertisement.
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...

History

Skip to main content
Below is an advertisement.
CUBS TIMELINE
1800s | 1900s | 1910s | 1920s | 1930s | 1940s | 1950s | 1960s | 1970s | 1980s | 1990s | 2000s
Timeline
    

In 1920, Weeghman Park becomes known as Cubs Park, after chewing gum magnet William Wrigley buys out the remainder of Charles Weeghman's share of the club. The park would undergo yet another name change in 1926 when it becomes Wrigley Field. That same year, plans are revealed to add a second tier to The Friendly Confines, which increases capacity to 40,000. In 1929, under Hall-of-Fame manager Joe McCarthy, the Cubs win the National League pennant by more than 10 games. Nearly 1.5 million people pack Wrigley Field to marvel at the hitting exploits of future Hall of Famers Rogers Hornsby (the year's NL MVP), Hack Wilson, Gabby Hartnett and Kiki Cuyler. Despite all of the firepower, the Cubs lose the World Series to the Philadelphia A's, four games to one. During the decade, Wilson and Grover Alexander lead the team at the plate and on the mound. Wilson finished the period with 121 home runs and 517 RBIs while the right-hander Alexander lead with 110 Ws and a 3.02 ERA.

1922  - August 25, 1922: Cubs beat Phillies 26-23 in highest-scoring game in major-league history.
1925  - April 14, 1925: With Quin Ryan at the mike, WGN Radio broadcasts its first regular-season Cubs game, as Chicago defeats Pittsburgh by an 8-2 margin in Charlie Grimm's Cubs debut.
1926  - November 16, 1926: Plans announced to double-deck Wrigley Field, increasing seating to 40,000.
1929  - October 8, 1929: Cubs fall 3-1 to Philadelphia in first World Series game at Wrigley Field.
1800s | 1900s | 1910s | 1920s | 1930s | 1940s | 1950s | 1960s | 1970s | 1980s | 1990s | 2000s